Persisting Petrichor and a Millipede

Wednesday night, I did not go to bed; had to work on an email migration project that could not be postponed. Of course, we encountered an issue, resulting in the need for me to spend many, many hours doing manual configuration. I was finally able to take a nap around 10am Thursday morning for about 4 hours. Needless to say, my circadian rhythm was severly interrrupted. Thursday night’s sleep was still affected, not being able to fall asleep until 2 or 3am Friday morning. As a result, I had trouble falling asleep Friday night, as well.

I laid in bed, thinking about all the projects I wanted to complete. I’d been wanting to research a millipede we discovered a couple weekends ago in Broken Bow, OK. While reading the Wikipedia article about the millipede having an aposematic colouring to warn that they are toxic, I eventually stumbled upon an article about the word that describes the scent of rain, petrichor. This had absolutely nothing to do with what I had originally wanted to research, but that’s where I found myself. I needed some music to help me fall asleep. Naturally, I took to Spotify to search the word to see if anyone else was clever enough to use it in a song or playlist. Turns out, there were over 10 artists using the name, over 20 albums using the name, and multitudes of playlists using “petrichor”.

I needed to create a unique playlist name. It was also the last day of April, which is a commonly rainy month in North America. I’ve been on an electronic music kick lately, so my new Spotify playlist was born: Persisting Petrichor. Thought it would be a nice alliteration and play on words, considering I ended up using multiple songs and artists of the same name with different songs and electronic music is often repetitive and persisting. The “petrichor” was persisting. The scent of the rain was persisting, as it had been raining for a few days in a row. Aptly named, even if I do say so myself.

Without further ado, Persisting Petrichor:

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We enter my Persisting Petrichor playlist with Petrichor, the smell of rain on his eponymous album Petrichor, the smell of rain with the track “Descent“. This track feels like a good opener, featuring some experimental lingering or persisting sound of that initially-plugged-into-a-guitar-amp feedback, as in the sound that’s hear at the beginning of a session, much how petrichor describes the scent at the beginning of a rain session. It’s just ethereal enough to prep you for the remaining tracks of the list, but doesn’t linger past two minutes. We leave Descent with some fierce, high-pitched strums of the guitar strings, in an almost percussive bell ringing sort of way.

We’re seamlessly cross-faded into a collab featuring QUIET BISON on Tek Genesis‘s album Temp in the track “Petrichor“. Those early Asian monestary bells are the calm before that melodic intro synth preps foreshadows that juicy bass drop, full of experimentation and layers of effects until you beg for a break at the middle of the song.

Here’s the Xystodesmidae millipede we discovered that I was originally researching. Photo taken at the Broken Bow Lake Spillway Overlook in Oklahoma, USA on 4/17/2021.

Rediscovering the music

I love discussing music with Derek. During a chat yesterday, he shared with me an album from his teen years. I, too, wanted to share a memorable album with him from the same era, but I could not recall a specific memory. In hindsight, I wish I’d logged my music experience during my formative years.

Oh! But wait, I still have a couple of “car visor CD holders” stored in the closet! Other than transporting them from one closet to the next over the past two decades, I haven’t listened to a Compact Disc since 2012, when I started using Spotify. Let’s bust out the discs and try to match a memory with each.

Here are 40 music CDs Alicia and I could not stop playing during the 2000s and 2010s with a few quips for my own memories. 😎